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Battle of Lone Jack

A small, brutal battle took place here on August 16, 1862. Efforts to preserve and expand the site are under way under the auspices of The Friends of Historic Lone Jack, Inc.

Battle of Kirksville

Forces under John McNeil inflicted a major defeat on Col. Joseph Porter’s command in a battle fought throughout the town on August 6, 1862, bringing to an end Porter’s famous 1862 raid into northeast Missouri.

Battle of Athens

Site along the Iowa border in extreme northeast Missouri was the scene of the battle of August 5, 1861. The Battle of Athens was the northern-most battle fought in the American Civil War.

Battle of Bryam’s Ford

Battle on 10/22/64 by Union troops to delay Shelby’s advance on Kansas City, and was opening operation in the Battle of Westport. Defended by CSA troops under J.S. Marmaduke on 10/23/64 to block Pleasonton’s cavalry’s approach to Westport.

Battle of Belmont

Scene of the Battle of Belmont, U.S. Grant’s first battle (November 7,1861), is marked by an interpretive panel located at the river at the east end of State highway 80. The battlefield is in a pristine state, but is in private ownership.

Battle of Wilson’s Creek

The West’s “Bull Run,” this battle on August 10, 1861 was a gamble by Union commander Nathaniel Lyon, who struck a blow against overwhelming numbers of Confederate and State Guard troops camped here for a planned attack on Springfield. Lyon was killed at the...

Battle of Drywood Creek

1861 battle was fought during Price’s Lexington Campaign. Battle site is 8 miles west of Nevada.

Battle of Boonville (4th)

Confederates entered and left Boonville in mid-October of 1864 with few skirmishes while being tracked by Union forces. This was the last time the fleeing Confederate forces would pillage the town.

Battle of Boonville (3rd)

General Joseph Shelby’s forces attacked Union troops on October 11, 1863. When Union General Brown arrived the next day, Shelby retreated west.

Battle of Boonville (2nd)

Colonel William Brown led an attack with 800 men on Sept 13, 1861 which would cost him and his brother their lives. The Boonville Home Guard defended the town as troops retreated to Lexington.